The Question of Legitimacy: Kenya's Recognition Policy of Governments under Moi during the Cold War – Eastern Africa Countries (1978-1990)

https://doi.org/10.32996/jhsss.2020.2.6.26

Authors

  • Danvas Ogeto Mabeya Southeast Community College, Education Square (ESQ), 111 O St., Ste 112, Lincoln, Nebraska. 68508-3614, USA

Abstract

During the 1970’s, majority of states, including Kenya followed the practice of recognizing states and not governments. In so doing, they downplayed the granting of formal recognition to new governments. Kenya’s policy, then, was clearly stated in parliament in 1971 when the then foreign affairs minister, Dr. Njoroge Mungai, was asked to comment on the Kenya government’s position on the military regime of General Idi Amin of Uganda. He stated, “Kenya could not afford to interfere with internal matters of another state nor let any state interfere with internal matters of Kenya.” However, during the Post–Cold War period, Kenya’s recognition policy underwent major transformations to include recognition of de jure governments. This study critically examines Kenya’s practice during and after the Cold War in a bid to reveal any distinct policy trends if any. The study aims to ascertain how, Kenya’s recognition policy, has largely, been formulated, articulated and exercised during Moi’s administration (1978-1990).

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Published

2020-11-30

How to Cite

Mabeya, D. O. . (2020). The Question of Legitimacy: Kenya’s Recognition Policy of Governments under Moi during the Cold War – Eastern Africa Countries (1978-1990). Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Studies, 2(6), 260-270. https://doi.org/10.32996/jhsss.2020.2.6.26