Environmental Generation Framework: A Case of Environmental Awareness Among farmers and Senior High School Students for Sustainable Development

Environmental Generation Framework, environmental awareness, sustainable development, farmers, SHS students

Authors

  • Isaac Kwaku Adu
    lordadu18@gmail.com
    Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda City, Tokyo 102-8554, Japan
  • John Joseph Puthenkalam Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda City, Tokyo 102-8554, Japan
  • Kwabena Effah Antwi Natural Resource Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre. 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, P6A 2E5, Canada
April 17, 2021

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Having access to a reliable environmental source of education contributes to pro-environmental behaviors. Yet, it is unclear whether such environmental education should be centered on the current or the next generation. To investigate the possible impact of environmental education on sustainable development and make a comparison between the older and the future generations, this research surveyed 376 household heads (also farmers) from two municipalities and 200 Senior High School students from four municipalities/districts in the Eastern region of Ghana. The results revealed that both farmers and students demonstrated considerable environmental awareness. However, the students showed a higher and acceptable cumulative percentage environmental knowledge score than the farmers. The results from the Linear Probability Model estimates of perceived environmental knowledge indicate that being a male increases the probability of having perceived environmental knowledge by 30.8 percentage points, controlling other demographic characteristics. Whiles being enrolled in a Senior High School (young generation) increases the probability of having perceived environmental knowledge by 30.8 percentage points. Furthermore, over 98% of the students indicated their availability to equip themselves better to confront the deteriorating environment compared to 81% of the older generation. The results revealed that the younger generation has the motivation, readily available to gain more knowledge and skills to become and raise an environmental generation. These meet the three most important elements of the Environmental Generation Framework, which focus on the younger generation to achieve sustainable development.