Professional and Institutional Discourse: A Case Study of Media Discourse

https://doi.org/10.32996/ijels.2021.3.3.3

Authors

  • Waqar Hassan Lecturer (visiting) Department of English TESOL University of Okara Pakistan
  • Nadia Perveen Thalho Instructor/Lecturer Government Elementary College of Education Women Hyderabad Sindh, Pakistan
  • Yasmeen Mehboob Lecturer at AKUIED Karachi, Pakistan

Keywords:

Discourse, media discourse, professional discourse, AntConc, media domain, vocabulary of media, corpus analysis

Abstract

Professional discourse has established in the last few decades. As a control, many applied etymologists and discourse experts have managed it in an insightful way. The main striking work on professional discourse is The Construction of Professional Discourse (Gunnarson et al., 1997). This quantitative study's objective was to identify the professional discourse and define the types of discourse. For this data was collected from Three Pakistani TV news channels named ARY Digital, Express News and Geo News. The data consisted upon the one week recording of TV news channels. Audio recording transform into text format and one corpus-based file was developed. Further corpus analysis tool AntConc version 3.5.9 was used to get the data's frequencies and concordance. On the base of extracted concordance and frequencies descriptive analysis was done and then subjectively analyzed to get the professional discourse from media channels. The study's findings presented that media is a vast profession and has its own particular vocabulary that identifies their profession. Media discourse has specific domains and topics for discussion. This study's findings will help the learners of sociolinguistics and discourse analysis in their case studies.

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Published

2021-03-29

How to Cite

Hassan , W. ., Thalho , N. P. ., & Mehboob, Y. . . (2021). Professional and Institutional Discourse: A Case Study of Media Discourse. International Journal of English Language Studies, 3(3), 16-25. https://doi.org/10.32996/ijels.2021.3.3.3